San Diego SPJ: Intimidation of Journalists at the Border Needs to Stop

Five American journalists have sued the U.S. government, alleging that authorities violated their First Amendment rights by inspecting their cameras and notebooks and questioning them extensively about their coverage of last year’s migrant caravan. Their detailed accounts, on pages 15-34 of a complaint filed Nov. 20 by the ACLU, are alarming and should be read by any journalist who leaves or enters the United States.

It is also alarming that the detained journalists were all freelancers, who may have been seen as easier targets for harassment.

We understand the caravan was a significant challenge for law enforcement, but harassing journalists for confidential information as a condition to return home is not how to address it. The actions described in the lawsuit amount to a direct attack on journalists’ ability to do their jobs and, if not addressed and corrected, could have a chilling effect.

The U.S. government has yet to publicly address its actions in any meaningful way. Those actions may never have come to light if KNSD, the NBC station in San Diego, hadn’t received records from a government whistleblower showing the names and photographs of 59 people that the agency linked to the caravan. Ten were identified as journalists.

The San Diego Pro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists applauds the ACLU for taking on this issue and asks the public for its support in ensuring this intimidating behavior stops. Journalists are not informants or intelligence agents for the U.S. government. These tactics are common in dictatorial regimes but have no place in a healthy democracy.

EVENT: One Year After the Caravan: What We Learned About Covering the Border and Immigation

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Last November at the Tijuana-San Diego border, the migrant caravan arrived, and along with it, a flood of international coverage. Images of thousands of weary people, tear gas canisters, mothers fleeing with children, and makeshift shelters overflowing with sewage captured the public imagination. Yet as media attention waned and families remained at the border, what happened next?
Please join the San Diego chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists at San Diego Central Library‘s Shiley Special Events Suite (9th floor) on Wednesday, Nov. 6 for a lively discussion on the caravan, the border, and immigration policy. Our featured panelists are veteran journalists from Tijuana and San Diego who will reflect and share their thoughts about what unfolded in the year following the “caravan.”
Free and open to the public.
WHO:
Guillermo Arias, photographer, AFP Tijuana
Vicente Calderon, Editor, Tijuana Press
Inés García, reporter, Zeta
Jordi Lebrija, videographer, Reuters/ Associated Press / CNN
Maya Srikrishnan, reporter, Voice of San Diego
WHEN: Wednesday, Nov. 6
Light food/social hour starting at 6 p.m.
Program begins at 6:30 p.m.
Moderated by Erin Siegal McIntyre, investigative author
PARKING IS FREE WITH VALIDATION.
More details and updates: https://bit.ly/2VM3skn

Joint Media Groups Event: Mental Health and Self Care for Journalists

San Diego journalism groups are teaming up on Oct. 22 to host an important conversation about mental health and self-care for journalists during and after tragic events and the effect these events have on media consumers.
Please note that pre-registration is required for this event. RSVP here: https://bit.ly/2mHPhiS
WHEN: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 22
WHERE: Colt Hall at Point Loma Nazarene University – 3900 Lomaland Dr, San Diego, California 92106
PANELISTS:
Pauline Repard, reporter, The San Diego Union-Tribune
Rachel Moore, former U-T Copy Editor, now psychotherapist
Tammy McCoy-Arballo, psychologist
Wayne Beach, director of the Center for Communication, Health, and the Public Good, San Diego State University
ORGANIZERS: San Diego chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists, Association of Black Journalists, Asian American Journalists Association, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, the San Diego Press Club and National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, Pacific Southwest, Point Loma Nazarene University’s Department of Literature, Journalism, Writing & Languages

Oct. 14 : Making (Better) Headlines

With a flat headline, readers may never see the first sentence. A headline that oversells or misleads undermines our credibility and undercuts our hard work. How do you write compelling headlines and social media posts that leave readers and viewers wanting to know more and accurately reflect what’s in the story?

Join the San Diego chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists at the San Diego Central Library on Monday, Oct. 14 for a panel discussion on headlines and social media posts. We’ll delve into the do’s and don’ts of what makes them sing.

Free and open to the public.

WHO: Ryan Bradford, web editor and writer, San Diego City Beat; Sara Libby, managing editor, Voice of San Diego; Paul Krueger, senior field producer, NBC 7 San Diego; Kelly Davis (moderator), independent reporter. Attorney Matthew Halgren, a specialist in news media law at Sheppard Mullin’s San Diego office and an SPJ San Diego board member, will also make introductory comments on legal considerations.

WHEN: Monday, Oct. 14, 6 p.m. social hour with light food, 6:30 p.m. start.

WHERE: San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., San Diego 92101. Shiley Suite on the ninth floor. FREE PARKING IN LIBRARY GARAGE WITH VALIDATION STAMP IN LOBBY.

RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/391641318157485/

Bring your questions or send them in advance to spjsandiego@gmail.com.