Announcing This Year’s SD-SPJ Award Winners

We’re excited to announce the winners of this year’s annual journalism contest. We’ve appreciated your patience as we considered how to best celebrate this year’s winners during a pandemic that has brought new challenges and tough decisions for all of us. 

Click here to view a list of award winners—except for our special awards and scholarships, which will be announced Monday, Aug. 24, via video. The video will also feature a short speech by our Journalist of the Year, who we’ll be announcing Aug. 20 — stay tuned! First-place winners can also check out comments on those awards here.

Congratulations to all our winners! Your hard work and dedication to your craft consistently impress us!

Special note about receiving your awards: As in past years, first place winners will receive a plaque. First place winners will be notified when plaques arrive, and will be sent pick-up instructions. Second and third place winners will receive a certificate. We’ll announce dates and locations for picking up your awards later this month. If you received a second or third place award, and DO NOT want a certificate, please email spjsandiego@gmail.org by Wednesday, Aug. 26, to let us know.

Election Results Are In

San Diego SPJ’s annual election results are in. Congratulations to new board members Jill Castellano of inewsource, Kendra Sitton of San Diego Community Newspaper Group and freelance journalist Jared Whitlock. They join returning re-elected board members Andrew Bowen, Kelly Davis, Andrew Kleske and Tom Jones.

Thanks to outgoing board members Brooke Binkowski, Elliot Spagat and Megan Wood for their service on behalf of San Diego’s journalism community.

You can learn more about the San Diego SPJ board here.

San Diego SPJ: Intimidation of Journalists at the Border Needs to Stop

Five American journalists have sued the U.S. government, alleging that authorities violated their First Amendment rights by inspecting their cameras and notebooks and questioning them extensively about their coverage of last year’s migrant caravan. Their detailed accounts, on pages 15-34 of a complaint filed Nov. 20 by the ACLU, are alarming and should be read by any journalist who leaves or enters the United States.

It is also alarming that the detained journalists were all freelancers, who may have been seen as easier targets for harassment.

We understand the caravan was a significant challenge for law enforcement, but harassing journalists for confidential information as a condition to return home is not how to address it. The actions described in the lawsuit amount to a direct attack on journalists’ ability to do their jobs and, if not addressed and corrected, could have a chilling effect.

The U.S. government has yet to publicly address its actions in any meaningful way. Those actions may never have come to light if KNSD, the NBC station in San Diego, hadn’t received records from a government whistleblower showing the names and photographs of 59 people that the agency linked to the caravan. Ten were identified as journalists.

The San Diego Pro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists applauds the ACLU for taking on this issue and asks the public for its support in ensuring this intimidating behavior stops. Journalists are not informants or intelligence agents for the U.S. government. These tactics are common in dictatorial regimes but have no place in a healthy democracy.

San Diego SPJ Statement on AB 5

The San Diego Pro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists wants to thank Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez for her willingness to listen to our concerns, and those of other freelance journalists, regarding AB 5.

We cannot predict exactly how employers, or the courts, will interpret AB 5 after it goes into effect next year, and many of our members remain concerned over what this bill will mean for them. The final version allows a hiring entity to accept up to 35 submissions per year from a particular freelance contributor. If the hiring entity would like additional content, it must classify the contributor as an employee. Assemblymember Gonzalez agreed to raise this cap from 25, and amended the bill to clarify what constitutes a “submission.”

A submission is: “one or more items or forms of content by a freelance journalist, editor or cartoonist that: (I) pertains to a specific event or topic; (II) is provided for in a contract that defines the scope of the work; (III) is accepted by the publication or company and published or posted for sale.” The bill also states: “Items of content produced on a recurring basis related to a general topic shall be considered separate submissions.”

For freelance still photographers and photojournalists, a submission is: “one or more items or forms of content … that: (I) pertains to a specific event or specific subject; (II) is provided for in a contract that defines the scope of the work; and (III) is accepted by and licensed to the publication or stock photography company and published or posted. Nothing in this section shall prevent a photographer or artist from displaying their work product for sale.”

These are improvements from the bill’s original language, brought about through the work of a coalition of 20 trade organizations that included SD-SPJ. We remain hopeful that as AB 5 is implemented, freelance journalists and photographers will continue to be able to earn a living in California and news organizations will value their work with fair treatment and compensation.