EVENT: One Year After the Caravan: What We Learned About Covering the Border and Immigation

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Last November at the Tijuana-San Diego border, the migrant caravan arrived, and along with it, a flood of international coverage. Images of thousands of weary people, tear gas canisters, mothers fleeing with children, and makeshift shelters overflowing with sewage captured the public imagination. Yet as media attention waned and families remained at the border, what happened next?
Please join the San Diego chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists at San Diego Central Library‘s Shiley Special Events Suite (9th floor) on Wednesday, Nov. 6 for a lively discussion on the caravan, the border, and immigration policy. Our featured panelists are veteran journalists from Tijuana and San Diego who will reflect and share their thoughts about what unfolded in the year following the “caravan.”
Free and open to the public.
WHO:
Guillermo Arias, photographer, AFP Tijuana
Vicente Calderon, Editor, Tijuana Press
Inés García, reporter, Zeta
Jordi Lebrija, videographer, Reuters/ Associated Press / CNN
Maya Srikrishnan, reporter, Voice of San Diego
WHEN: Wednesday, Nov. 6
Light food/social hour starting at 6 p.m.
Program begins at 6:30 p.m.
Moderated by Erin Siegal McIntyre, investigative author
PARKING IS FREE WITH VALIDATION.
More details and updates: https://bit.ly/2VM3skn

Joint Media Groups Event: Mental Health and Self Care for Journalists

San Diego journalism groups are teaming up on Oct. 22 to host an important conversation about mental health and self-care for journalists during and after tragic events and the effect these events have on media consumers.
Please note that pre-registration is required for this event. RSVP here: https://bit.ly/2mHPhiS
WHEN: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 22
WHERE: Colt Hall at Point Loma Nazarene University – 3900 Lomaland Dr, San Diego, California 92106
PANELISTS:
Pauline Repard, reporter, The San Diego Union-Tribune
Rachel Moore, former U-T Copy Editor, now psychotherapist
Tammy McCoy-Arballo, psychologist
Wayne Beach, director of the Center for Communication, Health, and the Public Good, San Diego State University
ORGANIZERS: San Diego chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists, Association of Black Journalists, Asian American Journalists Association, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, the San Diego Press Club and National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, Pacific Southwest, Point Loma Nazarene University’s Department of Literature, Journalism, Writing & Languages

Oct. 14 : Making (Better) Headlines

With a flat headline, readers may never see the first sentence. A headline that oversells or misleads undermines our credibility and undercuts our hard work. How do you write compelling headlines and social media posts that leave readers and viewers wanting to know more and accurately reflect what’s in the story?

Join the San Diego chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists at the San Diego Central Library on Monday, Oct. 14 for a panel discussion on headlines and social media posts. We’ll delve into the do’s and don’ts of what makes them sing.

Free and open to the public.

WHO: Ryan Bradford, web editor and writer, San Diego City Beat; Sara Libby, managing editor, Voice of San Diego; Paul Krueger, senior field producer, NBC 7 San Diego; Kelly Davis (moderator), independent reporter. Attorney Matthew Halgren, a specialist in news media law at Sheppard Mullin’s San Diego office and an SPJ San Diego board member, will also make introductory comments on legal considerations.

WHEN: Monday, Oct. 14, 6 p.m. social hour with light food, 6:30 p.m. start.

WHERE: San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., San Diego 92101. Shiley Suite on the ninth floor. FREE PARKING IN LIBRARY GARAGE WITH VALIDATION STAMP IN LOBBY.

RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/391641318157485/

Bring your questions or send them in advance to spjsandiego@gmail.com.

San Diego SPJ Statement on AB 5

The San Diego Pro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists wants to thank Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez for her willingness to listen to our concerns, and those of other freelance journalists, regarding AB 5.

We cannot predict exactly how employers, or the courts, will interpret AB 5 after it goes into effect next year, and many of our members remain concerned over what this bill will mean for them. The final version allows a hiring entity to accept up to 35 submissions per year from a particular freelance contributor. If the hiring entity would like additional content, it must classify the contributor as an employee. Assemblymember Gonzalez agreed to raise this cap from 25, and amended the bill to clarify what constitutes a “submission.”

A submission is: “one or more items or forms of content by a freelance journalist, editor or cartoonist that: (I) pertains to a specific event or topic; (II) is provided for in a contract that defines the scope of the work; (III) is accepted by the publication or company and published or posted for sale.” The bill also states: “Items of content produced on a recurring basis related to a general topic shall be considered separate submissions.”

For freelance still photographers and photojournalists, a submission is: “one or more items or forms of content … that: (I) pertains to a specific event or specific subject; (II) is provided for in a contract that defines the scope of the work; and (III) is accepted by and licensed to the publication or stock photography company and published or posted. Nothing in this section shall prevent a photographer or artist from displaying their work product for sale.”

These are improvements from the bill’s original language, brought about through the work of a coalition of 20 trade organizations that included SD-SPJ. We remain hopeful that as AB 5 is implemented, freelance journalists and photographers will continue to be able to earn a living in California and news organizations will value their work with fair treatment and compensation.